(Source: faisdm)

super-mario-rpg:

roxenfel:

the nintendo ds came out 10 years ago

image

(Source: historyexam, via flunafloon)

absinthecake:

When people ask how you’re doing at the end of the semester

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(via oppositecorner)

nargyle:

getting back into the swing of drawing after a long dry spell 

WYNT HAS SET HIS SKYPE ICON TO A PICTURE I DREW WHEN I WAS REALLY YOUNG AND WON’T CHANGE IT I’M CRYING

WYNT HAS SET HIS SKYPE ICON TO A PICTURE I DREW WHEN I WAS REALLY YOUNG AND WON’T CHANGE IT I’M CRYING

bunny-bo:

ghost-anus:

have you ever met someone on the internet that you liked so much that you sometimes sit there and think “oh man there are people who are lucky enough to see this person IN THE FLESH ON A REGULAR BASIS and I wonder if they realize how LUCKY they are”

Do you ever wonder if people think that about you?

(via flunafloon)

sizvideos:

To the Boys Who May One Day Date My Daughter - Video

(via gay-men)

rukokarasu:

THIS IS SIMPLY TOO SILLY

rukokarasu:

THIS IS SIMPLY TOO SILLY

(via nightmargin)

raiddevblog:

"Ehh, I’ll just doodle something real quick."

image

image

image

"Bugger."

jamietheignorantamerican:

Anna is perhaps one of the biggest plot hogs I’ve ever seen. Although she might be a strongly written character, the way that the film focused solely on her gave all the other characters (Elsa and Kristoff), absolutely no time for their own personal character development and exposition. Elsa’s anxiety and mental illness served as a plot device, and instead of it being a part of her character, it became all of her character. Even when the film ends, Elsa’s anxiety isn’t even acknowledged, nor is it fully justified or even noticed by the other characters. By the time the film ends, we know close to nothing about Kristoff, we aren’t given background or even a good decent reason for why he disliked people before (as we see him with the ice harvesters early in the film). It’s clear just by watching the film that Anna commands all the attention, all the screen-time, all the conflict, and all the focus of the story. The fact that Elsa’s ONLY solo song, “Let It Go” is the most popular (and the only memorable one) in the entire film, speaks volumes to how she SHOULD have been treated; as the main character, and not a plot device to further Anna’s own personal story.

jamietheignorantamerican:

Anna is perhaps one of the biggest plot hogs I’ve ever seen. Although she might be a strongly written character, the way that the film focused solely on her gave all the other characters (Elsa and Kristoff), absolutely no time for their own personal character development and exposition. Elsa’s anxiety and mental illness served as a plot device, and instead of it being a part of her character, it became all of her character. Even when the film ends, Elsa’s anxiety isn’t even acknowledged, nor is it fully justified or even noticed by the other characters. By the time the film ends, we know close to nothing about Kristoff, we aren’t given background or even a good decent reason for why he disliked people before (as we see him with the ice harvesters early in the film). It’s clear just by watching the film that Anna commands all the attention, all the screen-time, all the conflict, and all the focus of the story. The fact that Elsa’s ONLY solo song, “Let It Go” is the most popular (and the only memorable one) in the entire film, speaks volumes to how she SHOULD have been treated; as the main character, and not a plot device to further Anna’s own personal story.

(via daco-taco)